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Part 3 of 3: 14 Copy Tips

Friday, May 20, 2022

Part 3 of 3: 14 Copy Tips

Over the last 3 days, we’ve gone into the keys of Direct Mail Marketing. Today I'll help you write the copy for your next direct mail piece.

1. Translate features into benefits

Don't just give information and assume that the reader will interpret. For example, front wheel drive is a product feature on an automobile used in advertising a car. It would be a great mistake just to say that and assume that the reader knows why front wheel drive is a desirable feature. The advertising has to go on to explain the benefits of front wheel drive safety, including improved cornering, improved breaking, better mileage and so on.

2. Write from the “you” perspective, not the “I” or “we” perspective

Say, “You will benefit greatly from the extraordinary durability.” Don't say, “We build the most durable.”

3. Communicate credibility

Credibility can be demonstrated with your time and business, the size of your company, the number of customers served, testimonials from satisfied customers, your membership in influential associations, guarantees and warranties, and all of these things combined.

4. Use dramatic license

You should not deceive or misrepresent anything, but you can dramatize it. Here's an example you're familiar with: Remington's President says in the commercials, “I like this Remington shaver so much that I bought the company.” Well, that's silly. That man is a shrewd, astute experienced business person and I assure you that his acquisition of Remington was based on careful analysis of many different factors, only including the quality of the product, but his statement is at least partly true and is a dramatic way of talking about product quality. That's dramatic license.

5. Stories sell

Whenever you can use first person stories, third party stories about customers and antidotes to make key selling points, do so. Story sell, facts only tell.

6. Don't be afraid of long copy

Ad copy should be long enough to tell your story effectively and persuasively.

7. Utilize the writing technique of the “double readership path”

This is really quite simple, but extremely important. The idea is to understand and reach both ends of the spectrum of consumer behavior, the analytical behavior versus impulsive behavior. The analytical person will read lengthy copy and is interested in as much information as possible. The impulsive individual lacks the patience to read lots of copy and wants to get the message quickly. When you organize your copy and format, you should communicate the important points of your message in only the headline, subheads, photo captions and response device, so the impulsive person can quickly skim and still get the message and take positive action.

8. Keep your copy lean (not necessarily short)

Watch out for wordiness that distracts from the sales message. If a word or phrase does not advance the sales process, why is it there? Most copywriters like to edit their rough drafts after a day or two cooling off period. You may want to use this same approach.

9. Keep your sentences and paragraphs short

Complex sentence structure or long paragraphs are intimidating and confusing to many people. Don't make the common mistake of overestimating the intelligence and sophistication of your readers.

10. Create a sense of urgency

This can be done with discounts or bonus offers that expire within a certain time period or with extra incentives for fast response.

11. It's okay to compare apples to oranges

For example, the full training of these points comes as a bonus in my No B.S. Letter, which costs only $67 per month. You might easily pay $300, $400 or even $500 to obtain the same information by attending a seminar. And $67 is such a small sum. You might spend that much or more on a nice dinner for your family in a fancy restaurant.

12. Internal repetition is an important technique in a given direct mail piece.

It's wise to make the same point several different times, several different ways.

13. Use the power of the P.S.

Most direct mail copywriting pros agree that many people skip down to the PS of a letter and read that first. You can use this to your advantage in two ways; One, ensure that your letter has a PS and Two, make a powerful, interesting, persuasive statement in the PS. This is a good place to present the bonus offer, for example.

14. Become a student of advertising copy

Study all the direct mail advertising that you receive carefully and collect those pieces that you find particularly persuasive. Over a period of time, you'll begin identifying common ingredients in those pieces that you can copy in your own work.

You can see an example of this exact process in the sales letter written for my No B.S. Letter. Take time to review the copy, see all 14 steps in process, plus the points created in all the pieces of this 3-Part email campaign.

And if you’d like this training plus thousands of dollars in other bonuses, and you’re already a NO B.S. Letter subscriber, You can start listening right now inside your members area. This copy training comes from Midas Touch Marketing, Sections 1.4.

If you’re not yet a NO B.S. Letter subscriber and would like access to the Midas Touch for FREE(a $297 value), then Join The NO B.S. Letter Today (And Get The ‘Most Incredible Free Gift Ever’ - Plus $19,997 Of Pure Money Making Information - for FREE)

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