Watch The Journey

BLOG

CUSTOM JAVASCRIPT / HTML

Playing Blind Archery

Friday, November 11, 2022

Playing Blind Archery

Important Note: This is just a small part of an 8-page Q&A inside my December Newsletter which is focused on the keys to becoming a Renegade Millionaire. To get the full newsletter with additional articles and insights, become a member of my NO B.S. Newsletter before we go to print in a few days.

All of December is dedicated to help build Renegade Millionaires through Definite Goal Setting & Autonomy, which includes…

- An article from Russell Brunson about his definite aims with the Napoleon Hill foundation
- My new article “De-Randomizing Successful Achievement” with both Thoughts & Tactics needed to build your Renegade Millionaire System
- 8-pages of Q&A about creating that clarity and purpose, both in thought and in tactics
- “How I Went From A Struggling, Lost Serial Entrepreneur To Creating The Business Of My Dreams” by our member Kannary Keo
- New Article “4 Ways To Immediately Cash In With Upsells” by Jim Edwards
- And much more…

December’s newsletter is going to print on Monday, so depending on when you’re reading, this is your last chance to get your copy on your desk.

And I guarantee you won’t find a bonus offer like the one we provide for the NO B.S. Newsletter, with over $19,997 of pure money making information, my gift to you.

— — — —

Question from Russell Brunson:

I want to go back to Napoleon Hill’s first law of success, Definiteness of Purpose.

When you go into any agreement, whether it’s with a client or a goal for a business or whatever, and you’re picking that definiteness of purpose, what’s the process in your head of finding that clarity around the goal.

I know what it is, my team knows what it is, this is what we’re going toward. And obviously we have the rules and the structure, but I think a lot of people struggle with knowing exactly what target they’re aiming for.

Answer from Dan Kennedy:

You’re absolutely right. I call it “playing blind archery.”

A lot of people, in operating themselves, play blind archery. And a lot of people around them are confused and left to their own devices. Of course, if you shoot enough arrows, some of them will hit the target by accident, but that’s not a very productive or profitable way to approach much of anything, right? The opposite of that is great clarity. Hill used the word definiteness; we can use the word specificity.

Often you start broad and fuzzy. Let’s take Disney, not necessarily the Disney of the moment, but historically. They started with a very broad, big purpose: to be “The Happiest Place On Earth.” There’s no way to implement from just that. If you turn an army of 50,000 employees loose to run parks with the instruction: “Make sure this is the happiest place on Earth!” lots of luck with that. From there, everybody had to start to figure out what that meant. What makes people happy? And what makes them unhappy?

Under the Unhappy List, you get what irritates or annoys them. This is an exercise you can do with any business, because in reality, one of the things you would like your business to be for its customers is “The Happiest Place On Earth.”

The exercise is to ask these two broad questions:
- What makes people unhappy about a dental practice? What irritates them, what annoys them, what scares them?
- On the opposite side of that ledger would be: What would make them happy or happier…or at the very least, less unhappy?

So Walt and team had to crawl their way from the big idea to specificity, then get some principles, laws, strategies, and tactics. Because with a big operation like that, you’re gonna have to break it down place by place, function by function, experience by experience. Checking in at the hotel front desk is one thing, waiting in line to get on a ride is another thing, getting food is another thing, and so on.

I have often started a day with a new consulting client by backing them up from the narrow objective they came in with. They often come to me with some version of “I want a better ad / better advertising / better marketing.”

“But why?”

Often they’ll say, “Because I want more customers.”

“Well, do you really want more customers? Are you sure? Maybe you need fewer customers but better ones.”

So there’s this exploration to get to a clear picture of what success will look like at a benchmark. If you’ve ever assembled anything—some kind of toy for a kid at Christmas or, God forbid, furniture from IKEA—you know that the instructions aren’t nearly as helpful without a picture of what the completed thing looks like. That picture’s really important. It’s visual, factual, statistical; it’s what the success is gonna look like. Only then can you start to engineer it, figure out what’s gonna be required as governing principles for that to happen.

So if you loop back around to Disney, one of the things everybody figured out that would be necessary for happiness was cleanliness. What makes people unhappy about a lot of experiences, at parks and amusement parks and restaurants and public places, is that the locations are dirty. There’s trash on the ground and the restrooms are not clean. A governing principle became “We’re gonna have the cleanest place on earth.” Now we can move to strategies, tactics, and rules.

For example, a strategy would be to have a trash can every X number of feet, highly visible, more trash cans per square inch than any other place, so nobody’s got an excuse not to use one. They’re reminded all the time, “Hey, throw your trash away. There’s a trash can right here!”

Tactically, we’re gonna have a whole army of people in special uniforms running around and cleaning up. Not only are they cleaning the place up, their guests see ’em cleaning the place up, and therefore they realize they’re supposed to keep the place clean too.

Next are rules. A rule would be that everybody picks up trash. At Disney, you will see executives in suits hurrying through the park or down the boardwalk on their way to a meeting at the convention center, and see them stop and pick up trash. They will not leave it for the trash-picker-upper person, because the rule is that everybody picks up trash.

So this is a process of getting to macro and micro clarity about your purpose and your objectives.

If you take over New York City, and you define as a purpose that you’re going to have it as safe as possible for people to walk around and take the subway from place to place, now the process work begins.

- How the hell are we gonna make that happen?
- What principles have to be agreed upon?
- What rules have to be enforced?
- What strategies can we use?
- What tactics can we use?

Like signage becomes a big issue, as it is at Disney, tactically.

A lot of this stops at the vague end without process. People get together in a business for their annual retreat and they rewrite their mission statement, which is gonna get framed and put up on a wall at every location. They talk about company goals for the coming year, maybe they sing “Kumbaya.” HubSpot’s big convention is coming up and they have former president Obama as their keynote speaker. And no former president could really say anything that would be useful for everybody achieving whatever the stated goals were, but there he is.

In my first sales job, there was a company meeting. I flew from Cleveland to LA. It was the first time I’d ever been on an airplane. In the meeting, the sales manager and one of the three owners sat down individually with each territory sales guy, looked at the numbers, looked at the territory statistics, and set quotas for the coming year, by quarter—basically goals for how many total sales were going to be generated, how many new accounts were going to be opened. That meeting took about a half an hour.

I was brand new and didn’t know anything. I assumed it was possible that there was a system to this. So after the meeting, I asked the stupid question, “How do I do that?”

And nobody had an answer. The owner later said to me, separately and privately, without the sales manager there “You know, you’re the first person to ever ask that question.”

So everybody left the meeting and wandered off, uncertain about anything but the goals written on the wall. Well, that’s not gonna get you anywhere, right? I’m set loose with a company car, a five-state territory, a list of accounts, a list of potential accounts, and a trunk full of samples. Go get ’em. This is no good! There need to be governing principles enunciated, like how you decide where to go in the territory or when you start work every morning. Then there need to be rules, like rain, snow, sleet, if you’re a postal worker. Or the rule is that you visit no fewer than eight accounts a day every day in person, and you’d better be able to prove it at the end of the week.

A couple weeks later, one of the guys from that sales job was sent to spend a week on the road with me, sort of the learn-by-shadowing thing. Nice guy, but here’s what I learned from him:

  • I learned how to cheat on my expense account, which he was incredible at (for that, there was a system).
  • I learned how to pick up women at the Holiday Inn bar at the end of the day. He was pretty good at that too.
  • And I learned how to be random as hell.

That’s all I learned from him. But by my third month, I had developed my own set of governing principles and rules to impose on myself and on customers, along with some strategies and tactics. By the middle of the year, I was either #1 or #2 in every category of performance. And by the tenth month of the year, I quit in a rather unamicable way and a rather immature way, because I was very young.

But the point is that this is actually how most businesses operate. You will often hear business owners complain about the lack of and difficulty in finding good people. And that’s real. But often they get a good person who is potentially a good employee and could be productive and profitable and successful in the role they have for them, but they get ’em and throw ’em into the water with no swimming lessons and no system to operate. In many cases, they turn the good person into a bad person.

If you’re a football fan, you know that Cleveland is legendary as the place quarterbacks go to die. There are shirts that people wear with the list of all the quarterbacks we’ve had. We have the record: we’ve had more quarterbacks than any other two NFL teams added together. Almost all our draft choice quarterbacks fail here. Some go elsewhere and succeed, but mostly by the time we’re done with them, they’re ruined.

Now there’s no way of knowing if they were good or bad, but it’s like the guy who’s been divorced five times. Yeah, the first time could have just been bad luck, and the second time you married a psycho…but by the time you’re up to five, the common denominator in this equation of tragedy is YOU, not them. So there’s something about the way the Cleveland Browns manage their team and the quarterback position, the coaching relationship, that is killing quarterbacks. And this goes on in a lot of businesses.

Years ago, I had a business that today you would call a coaching program. We called it “practice management.” We had a lot of chiropractors. One in Huntington Beach, California, had risen from nothing to great success in a hurry with us. His volume was good, his revenue was good, but his office operation was chaos—lots of complaining about all the chaos down to a specific of staff tardiness. They were never there on time in the morning. They didn’t get back from lunch on time. It was like they didn’t have clocks. They were horrible at time management, and stuff was left undone.

I was going to be in LA for something else, and he asked if I’d come over on a Saturday morning and have a talk with his staff about time. And I said, “Sure.” The meeting was supposed to start at 9:30 in the morning. And my hotel was maybe half an hour from his office. (Fortunately, LA traffic on a Saturday morning is not what it is Monday through Friday.) But to have a cushion, we agreed that he was gonna pick me up at 8:30.

Well, the punchline of this story is that at 8:30, he wasn’t there. At 8:45, he wasn’t not there. Nine o’clock, he’s still not there. At about 9:10, he picked me up, drove like a maniac, and we arrived for the time seminar, which was supposed to start at 9:30, at 9:45. It turns out, of course, that was his normal behavior. Well, he didn’t have a prayer. The problem may or may not have been him, but it is sourced with him.

This goes on a lot. My friend and I joke about this often. We were at a nice restaurant the other night. We looked around and agreed “Gee, there must be a shortage of mirrors. Because if people had mirrors and they had looked at themselves before they left the house, they wouldn’t be in the condition that they’re in.” Well, there’s sort of a shortage of mirrors metaphorically with business owners and entrepreneurs and sales managers about this entire issue, however you wish to characterize it: clarity, definiteness, specificity, exactness.

— — — —

That’s only ONE answer from my 8 pages of detailed answers to the question of how to become a Renegade Millionaire in the Q&A section of my December Newsletter.

All of December is dedicated to help build Renegade Millionaires through Definite Goal Setting & Autonomy, which includes…

- An article from Russell Brunson about his definite aims with the Napoleon Hill foundation
- My new article “De-Randomizing Successful Achievement” with both Thoughts & Tactics needed to build your Renegade Millionaire System
8-pages of Q&A about creating that clarity and purpose, both in thought and in tactics
- “How I Went From A Struggling, Lost Serial Entrepreneur To Creating The Business Of My Dreams” by our member Kannary Keo
- New Article “4 Ways To Immediately Cash In With Upsells” by Jim Edwards
- And much more…

December’s newsletter is going to print on Monday, so depending on when you’re reading, this is your last chance to get your copy on your desk.

And I guarantee you won’t find a bonus offer like the one we provide for the NO B.S. Newsletter, with over $19,997 of pure money making information, my gift to you.

Don’t miss this our print date - we’ll make it worth your while with printed, visual and audio content to help you on your path to become a Renegade Millionaire.

Join The

Magnetic Marketing Challenge

For FREE!

Want a flood of new dream clients that beg to pay, stay, and refer… so you can watch your business explode in 2024!? Give us just 90 minutes a day, and over the 5-day sprint, we'll show you exactly how, for free!

Recent Posts

7 Awesome Direct Marketing Ads You Must Study

How Direct Marketing Is Used & Why It Works

Direct Email Marketing 101: Your Step-By-Step Guide

How To Determine The Perfect Direct Marketing Budget

6 Methods Of Direct Marketing That Work Like Crazy

Direct Marketing Goals - How To Set & Achieve

Are There Limitations Of Direct Marketing?

The Growth Of Direct Marketing

Coca-Cola’s Direct Marketing Strategy: A Case In Point

Direct Marketing Vs Brand Marketing - A Full Comparison

Categories

magnetic marketing logo

Copyright © 2024 Magnetic Marketing™ 
Privacy Policy  |  Terms